Alyce Foster, Ph.D

Alyce Foster, Ph.D

Alyce Foster, Ph.D., is a Senior Psychologist in the NYU School of Medicine WTC Health Program Clinical Center of Excellence (NYUSOM CCE). Dr. Foster received a B.A. in Psychology from Loyola University New Orleans before completing her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the New School for Social Research in New York City. Her involvement in the WTC Health Program began during her APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship training at Bellevue Hospital/NYU Langone Medical Center. She continued as the Clinical Psychology Post-doctoral Fellow for the program before assuming a full-time position as a psychologist. Dr. Foster has obtained specialized training in empirically supported treatments for posttraumatic stress including short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy, STAIR, and Prolonged Exposure. She also has extensive pre-doctoral training in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Her research interests include understanding trauma-related psychopathology throughout the life span and the relation between trauma exposure and mechanisms of emotion dysregulation. Her doctoral dissertation investigated the relation between complex trauma exposure and self-injurious behaviors among ethnic minority adolescents

Jonathan DePierro, Ph.D

Jonathan DePierro, Ph.D

Jonathan DePierro, Ph.D. is a Clinical Psychology Post-doctoral Fellow in the NYU School of Medicine WTC Health Program Clinical Center of Excellence (NYUSOM CCE). Dr. DePierro received his B.S. in Psychology from Fordham University; and his M.A. in General Psychology and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, respectively, from The New School for Social Research. He completed an APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship at Bellevue Hospital/NYU Langone Medical Center. Jonathan has received training in long and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy, dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), Skills Training in Affective and Interpersonal Regulation (STAIR), and Cognitive Therapy. His research interests include the impact of trauma on emotional development, including how trauma exposure may lead to paradoxically negative emotional responses to positive events; the impact of dissociation on information processing; and the use of psychophysiological methods (including heart rate variability, fMRI, EMG, and skin conductance) to supplement clinical diagnosis and treatment.